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Blogs and articles written by Chartered Environmentalist (CEnv) and Registered Environmental Technician (REnvTech) registrants, as well as Honorary Fellows of the Society (HonFSE).

 

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Top tags: CEnv  Chartered Environmentalist  pollution  Environment  HonFSE  25 Year Environment Plan  25YEP  Chartered  Plastics  Recycling  Waste  Articles  BBC  Bioeconomy  Blue Planet  Chair  Chartered Forester  CIWEM  CIWM  Clean Growth Strategy  Conference  DEFRA  Energy  Ersatz-Plankton  FICFor  Flooding  Forensics  Forester  Forests  Fossil Fuel 

Commercialisation and Household Waste and Recycling Centres (HWRCs) - Brian Mayne CEnv

Posted By Brian Mayne CEnv, 18 May 2018

Commercialisation and HWRCs

Chartered Environmentalist Brian Mayne, and John Woodruff from the Resource Efficiency & Waste Management team at Ricardo Energy & Environment look at the options for commercialisation of HWRCs.

Against a backdrop of China’s Operation Sword, austerity and Brexit, local authorities are under ever-increasing  financial pressure to adopt a commercial and entrepreneurial approach to generating income while continuing to deliver high quality and efficient customer-focused services. 

One service that has been developed over recent years is the introduction of charges for commercial waste at household waste and recycling centres (HWRCs), which not only provides economic benefits but improves local services to small businesses as well as protecting the provision of HWRCs for residents.

Councils have introduced a range of ways they can charge traders including:

  • Pay by weight
  • Pay by container, item or volume
  • Pre-payment of sacks
  • Subscription

Often these charges are linked to benefits whereby the customer pays less if they separate their waste – often separated recyclable materials are charged at a lower rate than mixed loads.  Unsorted loads, whether they’re made up of recyclable materials or not, normally attract a higher rate resulting in better quality recyclate with additional economic and environmental impacts.

There are a number of additional benefits to Local Authorities in taking this approach at HWRCs including:

Continue reading at letsrecycle.com »

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society for the Environment. 


Sources: letsrecycle.com »

Tags:  CEnv  Chartered Environmentalist  CIWM  Household Waste  HWRCs  Recycle  Recycling  Ricardo  Waste 

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Plastics and Recycling – Attitudes are Changing! - Dr Peter Matthews CBE HonFSE CEnv

Posted By Phil Underwood, 26 February 2018
Updated: 26 February 2018

Plastics and Recycling – Attitudes are Changing!

I have worked in environmental management for 53 years and I have never seen a time like this! Attitudes towards plastics and recycling are definitely changing.  

Until recently, many of my friends and relatives made relatively quick and independent judgements while deciphering what waste went into which bin. Any more detailed thinking and strategizing about this was simply viewed as “that sort of thing Peter does for a living.” But things have changed and I’m now persistently asked questions about these matters. But, to be quite frank, I’m not sure of the right answers.

The recycling information on packaging is often difficult to find, in very small print and it’s inconsistent and confusing. Which bin should the cling film that’s been soiled in use go into? Am I supposed to help solve the ‘Pringle tin problem’ by attempting to separate multi-material packaging? These are just some examples of the head-scratching that’s going on in many kitchens now.


The 25 Year Environment Plan

I was delighted to see recycling and plastics as well as many other popular issues picked up in the recently published 25 Year Environment Plan (YEP). It’s headline target of reducing avoidable plastic waste by 2042 is not the sort of commitment I would have expected a year ago. And, whilst there’s been some negative media focus on the Plan’s delayed publication, my own view is that the document is very welcome and it is comprehensive, perhaps more so for having incorporated issues that have come to the fore over the last couple of years. 

I think many initial reactions to the Plan had been given without detailed study of it alongside the Industrial and Clean Growth Strategies or perhaps because of the information-overload of this lengthy document with multiple goals and policies. Indeed, a standalone summary of these goals and policies would be helpful. 

Overall, though, I think the Plan does well to address and tie together people’s day-to-day worries and big, strategic themes. 

Media Influence

It’s interesting that the avalanche of media and public attention on the impact of plastic bags, food packaging, single-use bottles and coffee cups, straws and even tea-bags and glitter (!) is often attributed to the BBC’s Blue Planet II series, which is actually filled with images of turtles ensnared in plastic fishing nets, beaches strewn with things like discarded ropes and even a whale with a plastic bucket in its mouth. I talked about this kind of plastic waste in a previous blog, terming it ‘ersatz-plankton’ and arguing that, even with rigorous domestic litter control, there will inevitably be plastic waste that ‘leaks’ into the environment. 

We must prevent the continued ‘survival’ of these persistently problematic plastics, and I’m pleased to see the 25 YEP address their biodegradability. Seeking alternatives to synthetic plastics in the so-called ‘bioplastics’, such as starch- and cellulose-based products like bamboo fibre and cellulose micro beads, will also be absolutely crucial.  

There are, of course, many unanswered questions, such as whether such bioplastics are robust enough for products such as ropes and buckets and how easy these will be to reuse rather than recycle. Again, I’m pleased to see the 25 YEP recognise the opportunities for this kind of technological development alongside strategizing around the bioeconomy. Indeed, there are several strategies that underpin the Plan, such as on chemicals, biodiversity, waste and resources, litter and clean air. 

It seems to me, though, that there’s a missing piece in this jigsaw: a Plastics Strategy. Given how high-profile the topic is, it seems odd that there isn’t a specific strategy around it, and I advocate one. If strategies work for other parts of our green economy, then this should work for plastics. 


Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society for the Environment. 

Tags:  25 Year Environment Plan  25YEP  Bioeconomy  Blue Planet  CEnv  Chartered Environmentalist  Clean Growth Strategy  DEFRA  HonFSE  Industrial Strategy  packaging  Plastics  Pollution  Recycling  Waste 

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Forestry Without Plastic - Stuart Wilkie FICFor CEnv

Posted By Phil Underwood, 26 February 2018
Updated: 16 March 2018

Forestry Without Plastic

Chartered Forester Stuart Wilkie FICFor CEnv, Environment and Certification Manager at Scottish Woodlands, talks about forestry without plastic.

Oceans of floating plastic, images of choking turtles, a ban on all ‘unnecessary plastic’ by 2042. The world is waking up to the environmental damage caused by oil-based plastics. I believe that while government may be moving on a 25-year timeframe, public opinion will make plastic use much harder to justify, in a much shorter timescale. Witness the rush by supermarkets and coffee shops to reduce plastic use.

Can we be in the forefront, championing wood and paper as replacements for plastic while relying on the co-extruded plant bag and tree shelter? Can forestry keep its environmental credentials unless we also act?

If the purpose of these blogs is to initiate debate, let’s take a critical look at forestry’s favourite plastic products especially the stuff we let fall apart in woodlands.

The Tree Shelter

 I must admit that I cringe every time I reach the north end of the new Queensferry Crossing over the Forth. Thousands upon thousands of tree shelters have been used in the landscaping. Was there not a more sustainable alternative, a better way of doing things?

Do tree shelters really degrade to harmless products? I know of some that are over 20 years old and stopped believing degradability claims years ago. Clients are not always willing to pay for the removal of shelters, so many are left to break down into ever smaller pieces. Can we really accept that there is such a thing as a harmless flake of plastic in the environment any longer? With animals and birds found emaciated and dying having ingested a stomach full, can we as foresters really fill the food chain with plastic?

It is not about the products of chemical decomposition, but the damage the physical presence of pieces of plastic does in the environment.

Encouraged by successive grant schemes, foresters have embraced tree shelters as a panacea for broadleaf establishment, but are they? Have we become lazy in their use? Derek Patch’s article in the last issue of Chartered Forester was an interesting reminder of an all too common problem.

Surely, as professional foresters, we can come up with alternative and innovative solutions beyond the tree shelter and demand more sustainable products when we do use them. The right tree shelter, and only in the right place?

It is not just tree shelters of course. What about all those little bits of bailer twine around bundles of plants. Do your planters pick them all up and bag them?

Plant Bags

There was a time, it seems not so long ago to some of us, before the co-extruded plant bag. Trees were bee-hived or sheughed in (heeled in) prior to planting. We got by without trees in plastic bags and I think we were much more aware of plant handling. Bags are cheap, convenient, and unlike tree shelters, most bags are recovered from site. Perhaps bags are not the same environmental problem as shelters, (although many go to landfill). But we don’t need them. So, what does “unnecessary plastic” mean in terms of the government’s commitment. At what level would a plastic tax make us think again on their use?

Accept the Age of Plastic is Over

Of course, things will not change overnight but we have a responsibility here. In the short term to reduce our plastic use and to recover plastic when we do use it. The challenge for the manufacturers of plastic products is to come up with a biodegradable (preferably wood fibre) alternative. As foresters we need to challenge the accepted way of doing things, lead innovation and put pressure on our suppliers.


Photo credit: Stuart Wilkie FICFor CEnv


A blog by Chartered Forester and Chartered Environmentalist, Stuart Wilkie FICFor CEnv. For more forestry related blogs, please visit the Institute of Chartered Foresters website

Stuart's blog inspired a response blog from ICF Associate Member, Simon Place. Simon defends the current need for plastic use within forestry, but highlights the need for the use to be properly managed. Read Simon's blog here »

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society for the Environment. 

Tags:  25 Year Environment Plan  25YEP  CEnv  Chartered Environmentalist  Chartered Forester  FICFor  Forester  Forests  Plastic  Pollution  Tree  Trees 

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Eye of the Beholder - By Andrew Clark CEnv MIEMA

Posted By Andrew Clark CEnv MIEMA, 01 February 2018
Updated: 01 February 2018

“I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that” said Thomas Edison, in 1931.


Nearly 90 years on, we’ve made huge progress in global deployment of renewable energy, including solar. However oil and coal still account for around 62% of primary energy consumption, with renewables coming in just shy of 10%. Still a bit of work to do then Mr. Edison.

From a logical point of view it’s hard to deny the case for using renewables instead of their finite fossil friends. Why build dependence on a fuel that will run out?

But at what environmental expense do renewables come? Sure they reduce direct greenhouse gas emissions, and don't deplete finite resources, except in one sense they do. They have to be put somewhere.

"People must feel that the natural world is important and valuable and beautiful and wonderful and an amazement and a pleasure" said Sir David Attenborough, broadcaster and national treasure most recently known for the BBC's 'Blue Planet 2' which seemed to inspire the nation in 2017.

It’s a good point! Due to the nature of renewables however, it’s often by being placed in our most 'beautiful' and 'wonderful' spaces, as Attenborough puts it, they can have maximum output.

The rolling hillside exposed to high winds that turbines can harness, or the open fields which provide a perfect expanse for solar panels to harvest the sun’s rays. Now that is a tricky one from an environmental point of view. Is renewable energy or conservation more important?

On a recent trip to Iceland, I pondered this conundrum while stood in front of Gullfoss, one of the Country’s most amazing waterfalls. Gullfoss has almost been used for hydro power in the past.

Photo credit: Andrew Clarke, Some Green Guy. Location: Gullfoss, Iceland.

I’d like to think even the most committed renewables advocate would have some regret at the thought of such plans going ahead, given the detriment it would have to such an awe inspiring natural feature.

But Iceland is truly unique as the only country which sources 100% of its electricity and heat from renewables already, only using fossil fuel as back-up.

It wasn’t just its abundant resources in relation to its small population that motivated this transition. For Iceland the risks, given its remoteness, of energy insecurity and exposure to price volatility were too high. Also the cost of creating a national energy grid didn't make sense. Decentralised energy independence does makes sense, and is practically possible.

So what’s the lesson, this got me thinking…

There is an imperative to preserve our natural world, and we should do as little damage to it as possible while providing energy. But my gut says the greater need is to get off the fossil addiction.

If we don't, that's where way more damage to the natural world will accumulate down the line.

To echo Tomas Edison, I hope we tackle this way before fossil fuels run out. That is the lesson from Iceland, sometimes we need to view the risk as a bigger driver to act, rather than the opportunity. The longer we consider it an optional opportunity, the less choice we have.

For more blogs by Andrew, please visit somegreenguy.com »


This blog is intended to share opinion for informational purposes only, not to provide advice or represent any organisation. Facts and figures are accurate to the best of my knowledge but should not be relied upon.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society for the Environment. 

Tags:  CEnv  Chartered Environmentalist  Energy  Environment  Fossil Fuel  Renewables  Solar  Wind Turbines 

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Professor Carolyn Roberts CEnv Talks Flood Control on BBC Radio 4

Posted By Phil Underwood, 27 December 2017
Updated: 03 January 2018

Here at the Society for the Environment we are always excited to find and share examples of the work and contributions of Chartered Environmentalists and Registered Environmental Technicians, even if it is from a few months or years ago.

With the above in mind, we couldn't help ourselves in sharing this interview with Professor Carolyn Roberts CEnv on BBC Radio 4 from March 2016. Carolyn discussed the role of water and environmental sciences in analysing and preventing flooding events, as well as using science in police investigations. 

Listen Here

To listen, simply press play on the audio player above. 

 

BBC Description:

"Barely a month goes by without news of another catastrophic flood somewhere in the world, like the Boxing Day tsunami in 2004 or the flooding of New Orleans with Hurricane Katrina a year later, and the role of climate change is often mooted. Here in the UK this winter, flood victims were once again caught in a cycle of despair and anger as they tried to make sense of why their homes were flooded and what could be done to prevent it happening again.

Jim talks to environmental scientist, Professor Carolyn Roberts, who is pre-occupied by problems like this. She applies water science, in particular, to work out why such events occur and the role we humans play in them. Her passion for problem solving in watery places also takes her into the intriguing world of forensics where she assists the police when bodies are found floating in rivers and canals."

Tags:  BBC  CEnv  Chartered  Chartered Environmentalist  Environment  Flooding  Forensics  IES  Interview  pollution  Radio  Science  Water 

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CEnv Registration – What it Means to One ICE Member

Posted By Phil Underwood, 08 August 2017
Updated: 01 February 2018

Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) member Kate Cairns CEnv is an Independent Sustainability Advisor based in the North East of England. She was awarded Chartered Environmentalist (CEnv) status in June 2017 and took some time to tell ICE about her career and why she chose to apply for CEnv.

"I've always been passionate about the environment and followed my BEng in Civil Engineering from Bristol with an MSc in Environmental Technology from Imperial College. Fresh from this, I worked at WSP on research into passive downdraft evaporative cooling techniques (PDEC) to help cope with rising temperatures and the heat island affect in cities. It was fantastic to work with partners in Spain, Portugal and Israel on such an innovative project; to tackle how we can adapt buildings to deal with increasing global temperatures, still a topical issue two decades later.

Later in my life, my professional mission was greatly influenced by a personal tragedy when my little sister, Eilidh, was run down from behind by a fully laden tipper lorry whilst cycling to work. She died two hours later from catastrophic crushing injuries. I soon learned that my (construction) industry was prevalent in cyclists and pedestrian deaths with a fatality on average once per month under HGV wheels."

A new focus

"50% of cyclist deaths involve an HGV but HGVs make up only 4% of traffic, and twice as many pedestrians are killed by HGVs than cyclists. Tipper lorries, cement mixers and skip lorries are the most lethal; and this is largely due to the massive blind areas all around the cabs.

Having seen the excellent on-site safety culture whilst working at Terminal 5 I set about to change off-site safety culture of the industry launching my See Me Save Me campaign; to eliminate lorry danger through challenging industry, policy and justice.

I went to the European Parliament twice and secured a change to the law (Directive 96/53) in cab design. We also convinced the London Mayor to introduce a Safer Lorry Standard.

I've worked too with industry on a national standard to manage HGV risk (CLOCS – construction logistics and community safety), which is being rolled out across the UK. The CLOCS standard is now included in Northumberland Council's procurement strategy, planning policy and fleet management. I continue to speak at industry events, on national media, TV and radio, and do interviews with trade, national and local press to promote road safety.

With 60% of our children obese or overweight, rising pollution and congestion, active travel is essential in maintaining the health of our populations, cities and planet. Change of off-site safety culture is crucial in assuaging the fears of the public, who say vehicle danger, especially HGV risk, is the biggest deterrent to cycling."

I applied to become a Chartered Environmentalist because…

"…sustainability has been at the heart of my professional and personal life since the beginning. I hate waste, always strive for efficiency and seek out synergies; in materials, energy, effort or time. I grew up on the beautiful wild beaches of Northumberland and have great respect for the ocean, weather, our planet and environment.

I love my job because of the diversity of tasks, projects and clients; and that I contribute to not only improving company practices but to stretching industry standards in safety, sustainability and responsibility. I work to bring out the best in companies and their operations ultimately to make a greater contribution to society through what it is built and how it is built.

Chartered status gives credit to my ambition and expertise in protecting and enhancing our precious and fragile environment. I strongly believe that engineers should not simply "harness the great sources of nature for the use and benefit of man" but should allocate an intrinsic value to its existence.

By attaining CEnv, I think I've also gained respect and credibility from colleagues and clients. It is too soon to say what this means in tangible terms (as I was only awarded the qualification a month ago at time of writing), but it's reassuring to have the recognition of my expertise and experience through this qualification."

What's next?

"My business helps clients in three areas; sustainable construction, safe logistics and equality and diversity or fairness inclusion and respect (FIR).

I have been involved in developing CEEQUAL, a tool for improving sustainability in civil engineering, since inception in 2000, spending eight years on the board of directors, working as a trainer, verifier and assessor, piloting the scheme on the Terminal 5 project and watching those teams then apply it at the Olympics and other major projects. CEEQUAL has recently been bought by BRE, a company with global operations and I am excited about the potential for it to become ubiquitous on an international basis as it gains recognition overseas, and to work on more projects using it.

The industry is now recognising the business risk of not managing off-site safety including cost, reputation, insurance premiums, driver trauma, as well as the human cost. As an expert in this field, I'm looking forward to helping more companies understand the risk and opportunities for their business and implementing policies and practices to ensure they have responsible, safe and sustainable operations.

Finally, I have just been appointed Chair of the ICE Fairness, Inclusion and Respect (FIR) Panel and am excited about the movement in this area and having the opportunity to work with industry leaders to bring about change."

» Find out more about becoming a Chartered Environmentalist (CEnv) through ICE

Source - Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), a Licensed Body of the Society for the Environment. 

Author: Kathryn Denham-Maccioni, Marketing Specialist at ICE.

Tags:  CEnv  Chartered  Chartered Environmentalist  ICE  Institution of Civil Engineers 

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All at Sea: Coping with Litter and Ersatz-Plankton

Posted By Peter Matthews, 31 July 2017

Blog written by Dr Peter Matthews CBE OBE HonFSE CEnv, following his attendance at the Mott McDonald Ocean Plastics Conference on the 29th June 2017.


Photo credit: Alamy

I have rarely seen a topic grasp the imagination of both the scientific community, lay media and public concern as quickly as this topic, and I was pleased to be able to go to this [Ocean Plastics] Conference in Cambridge in my capacity as Chair of the Society. Although I could not stay for the whole event, I found it stimulating and enlightening.

I think that there still needs to be some greater clarity in the wider community on what the problems are and how we might set about resolving them. It is a classic case of ‘humanity cannot be green by regulation alone’.

 

Litter

The physical consequences for wildlife such as suffocation, strangulation, ensnarement, beach pollution and marine landscape despoilment. Marine plastics are then part of a bigger problem of litter management which embraces land as well as sea. Turtles can strangle as easily on abandoned rope nets as well as synthetic ones for example. But, synthetic nets may have different dispersion and flotation characteristics and will survive much longer, being less biodegradable. Plastic bags are a particular problem but may disintegrate in a marine environment. These problems can be controlled by litter management techniques on land and at sea, and is part of wider efforts on waste management including packaging.

Physical Degradation

Litter may break down physically in the marine environment, but the debris can cause physical and physiological problems to wildlife and marine landscape by the creation of adventitious small particles, particularly micro particles including microfibers. Therefore, plastic products have either got to be biodegradable or be sufficiently robust that physical degradation is slow enough to allow litter recovery before long term harm is caused.

Discharge into the Marine Environment - Microbeads

Planned use of micro particles added to products particularly plastic microbeads, then contributed adventitiously through waste discharges into the marine environment. A full ban in all products and shift to biodegradable beads will be the answer.

Discharge into the Marine Environment – Micro Particles

Other micro particles which are not added to products, but arise through other adventitious routes – particularly fibres from synthetic clothes in washing waters – and then discharged into the marine environment. This is a new issue and this may need some innovation in wastewater treatment technology. Changes in clothing materials will be really difficult.

Nano Particles

As far as I can see, there is less known about these than microbeads. But, concerns have been expressed about the use of TiO2 in cosmetics and ointments for example (not a plastic admittedly) and then discharged to the marine environment in waste water. It may well be that a ban on the use of these materials, except in the most essential medicines, would assist. And what about paint decoration products?

Biodegradation Products

We need to ensure that these are not ecotoxic.



The Way Forward

So, it seems to me that there are four key ways forward:

1...

The reduction of waste and litter in the first place including even more attention to packaging. For example, biodegradable wipes come in non-biodegradable sachets, and some food canisters have too many materials to recycle, greater attention to use and disposal by changing our habits, and tougher litter control. These might be helped by deposit schemes as we used to have and is now being trialled on bottles by Coca-Cola.

2...

The notion of biodegradability should move to being the norm rather than being the alternative to plastic. In the case of plastic bags, biodegradability is the notion which provides exemption from the levy. It raises the issue of whether we need a statutory direction or whether it would be left to behaviour. If we had an outright statutory or voluntary ban on plastic there could still be a levy on biodegradable bags to encourage the use of ‘life bags’. Biodegradability should apply wherever practicable to all plastic products. Biodegradability must come in two parts – land based decomposition and aquatic decomposition.

The slow progress on standard methodology leads one to muse as to whether there is a need to have a fresh look at the roles of BSI and the Standing Committee of Analysts in these matters. We await the outcome of the on-going review by Defra on methodology in the context of carrier bags. 

3...

We need a review of all household and personal products with a risk rating in terms of micro and nanoparticles and consideration being given to a registration system. This might need a review of how REACH will work post Brexit and whether new tests and regulated conditions are needed for consents to discharge industrial effluents in future legislation post the Great Repeal Act. I welcome the role of the Hazardous Substances Committee, in the context of microbeads, in the announcement of the forthcoming statutory ban next year.

4...

New insights are needed on the ability of detergents or similar chemicals (with no ecotoxicity obviously) to form microfiber micelles, which would then be more susceptible to being removed by conventional or modified used water treatment.

 

A Final Thought

One final thought about the small particles whether macro, micro or nano; they disrupt the marine food chains either by entering alongside phytoplankton in consumption by zooplankton or by co-ingestion alongside zooplankton. Either way they are artificial contributors to plankton and so I am proposing the formal title of ersatz-plankton.

The presentation slides from the Mott McDonald Ocean Plastics Conference can be downloaded here.

Tags:  CEnv  Conference  Ersatz-Plankton  HonFSE  Ocean  plastics  pollution  Sea 

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CIWEM Magazine Articles by Dr Peter Matthews CBE OBE HonFSE CEnv

Posted By Phil Underwood, 28 July 2017

Over the last few months former Chair of the Society for the Environment, Dr Peter Matthews CBE OBE HonFSE CEnv, has been providing insightful articles for the Chartered Institute of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) magazine 'The Environment'. 

We are pleased that CIWEM have given us permission to share these articles on our website for the wider environmental professional community to view. These articles touch on a broad range of environmental subjects, providing interest to environmental professionals working in many sectors.

Each article is listed below - please feel free to share with your colleagues and interested contacts. 

March 2016
Aspiration to Regulation

April 2016
From Paper to Practice

May 2016
What is the Role of Arm's Length Bodies?

June 2016
The Question of Independence

July / August 2016
Practical Regulation and the Community

September 2016
Getting to the Routes of Regulation

October 2016
Origins - Green Myth and Iconography

November 2016
Creating an Environment for Change

December 2016 / January 2017
What Will Brexit Mean for Environmental Regulation in the UK?

February 2017
Making the Best of Brexit

March 2017
Passionate Truth, Not Post Truth

April 2017
An Age of Environmental Chivalry

May 2017
Evidence Based Practice in Environmental Decision Making

June 2017
Behavioural Sciences Can Help Us

New articles will be added to this blog post when available. For more information about the magazine, please click here.

Tags:  Articles  CEnv  Chair  CIWEM  Environment  HonFSE  Magazine  REnvTech 

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